Monday, October 29, 2012

British Trans-Arctic Expedition at the North Pole, late 1960's.

                                                        





Sunday, October 28, 2012

Ottawa construction magnate Robert Campeau.

   



                                                                       





The winners and losers, when Canadian government property is sold.

                                                        THE WINNERS
  1. Donald Trump
  2. Carl Icahn
  3. Bill Gates
  4. Li ka Shing
  5. Prince al-Waleed bin Talal of Saudi Arabia
  6. gambling casinos - a CNR train station in Regina, Saskatchewan and the French pavilion at Expo '67 are gambling casinos.
  7. athletic stadiums
  8. Marathon Realty - the real-estate arm of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
  9. the Canada Lands Company - the real-estate arm of the Canadian National Railway.
  10. the General Electric Corporation.
  11. multinational timber, hydro-electric, bottled water, oil and gas and metal companies.
The Casino Regina in Saskatchewan.
Part of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre may be converted into a casino.

The Casino de Montreal in Quebec.





  



  





From: "The Marathon Realty Company Limited"; Nesbitt Research---February 1990.









The CPR train station in Summerhill, Toronto is now a Liquor Control Board of Ontario outlet.

 THE LOSERS
  1. The taxpayers of Canada, who built the train stations, convention centres, athletic stadiums, CBC buildings, airports, Pinetree Line radar stations, Diefenbunkers, aircraft hangars, SkyTrain in Vancouver, Expo '67 pavilions, Olympic venues, Coast Guard bases...
  2. Wildlife in our national parks, who are being driven off the land by tourist operators, real estate developers and resource companies.
  3. Researchers, who will find it difficult to find information once all the national libraries are dismantled and shut down.
  4. Canada's aerospace and aviation; military and railway history.







Friday, October 26, 2012

The Surplus Crown Assets Act (1985).

For half a century, the government of Canada has been selling and even giving away "surplus Crown assets." In 1954, a Greek billionaire named Aristotle Onassis bought a Royal Canadian Navy warship called the H.M.C.S. Stormont for $35,000 dollars. The Christina is now a tourist attraction on the Thames River in London, England.
During World War 11, Howard Hughes created a flying cargo ship called "The Spruce Goose", made almost entirely of wood. The Americans would never sell "The Spruce Goose" to a foreign tycoon, or to a lumber company, and the airplane is a major tourist attraction in Long Beach, California:

"The Spruce Goose" created by Howard Hughes.
The H.M.C.S. Bonaventure was decommissioned and sold as scrap metal to Taiwan:

H.M.C.S. Bonaventure
Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird halted the sale of 22 paintings from Canadian embassies; but a few days ago I noticed an article in the Globe and Mail newspaper, "Sotheby's to auction up to $11 million worth of Canadian art".
Were these paintings hanging on the walls of Canadian embassies, national museums and federal buildings?
OF COURSE THEY WERE
---see the article "Conservatives remove works of art from office walls" Postmedia News, October 23, 2011.
Canada and the United Kingdom will be sharing embassies abroad, so the paintings, sculptures, historic documents and tapestries at Canadian embassies are probably being shipped to Sotheby's and Christie's in  government diplomatic pouches, which cannot be searched or seized, according to the Vienna Convention. Any valuables that are too large for diplomatic pouches will be sold locally:
     Order-in-Council - March 10, 1994 - Financial Administration Act - Agreement with the University of London Library - transfer to the University Library the title and possession of the Canada House Library Collection at the Canadian High Commission in London, England. (From: a Privy Council Order-in-Council volume at Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa.)

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

The Prime Minister of Canada wants DND to reduce its real estate holdings.

For several years, I have been trying to save CFB Rockcliffe in Ottawa, Ontario. In 1983, CFB Rockcliffe encompassed 326.22 hectares or 806 acres; see my July 20,2012 blog "1984-1985 Federal Property Profiles-National Capital Region." 

CFB Ottawa North, Rockcliffe.



 The Canada Lands Company is the main recipient of "surplus" Department of National Defence property. The CLC has already privatized 13 military bases, and they are fighting at the Supreme Court of Canada for the title to the Kapyong Barracks in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
The Canada Lands Company, Via Rail and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation have been delisted from a Government of Canada website called "The Federal Directory of Real Property".
The Canada Lands Company paid $27.2 million dollars for the 310-acre CFB Rockcliffe---in 1998, CFB Rockcliffe was worth $1.3 billion dollars:
From: Defence Newsletter, July 1998.

According to a CLC document "all government departments are now able to accept promissory notes from CLC in lieu of cash at the time of closing without having to obtain Order-in-Council approval." (From: Page 8- CLC Annual Report, March 31 2008-"Getting the job done".)
The Crown corporation buys real estate from DND, Canada Post, Corrections Canada, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, the St. Lawrence Seaway, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Transport Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada (the AECL property at Tunney's Pasture in Ottawa is one example), Natural Resources Canada (the Booth Street Complex in Ottawa will soon be owned by the Canada Lands Company), Veterans Affairs Canada...the CLC also occupied the second floor at the Jasper Heritage Railway Station in Jasper, Alberta, a former Canadian National Railways property. The Canada Lands Company owns a landmark called The CN Tower, in perpetuity.

In the year 2000, Parc Downsview Park, a Canada Lands Company subsidiary, bought 32 acres of land at CFB Downsview with a 19 million dollar promissory note payable in the year 2050.
Military bases are privatized via Privy Council Orders-in-Council:
October 23, 1986 - Surplus Crown Assets Act - the former CFS FALCONBRIDGE. Authority for the Minister to sell 259 ha. of land to General Leaseholds Ltd.
1986 - Public Land Grants Act - Authorize the sale of the former Canadian Forces Radar Station at Penhold, Alberta to the Province of Alberta.
November 3, 1999 - Transfer to the Canada Lands Company of 205 acres of surplus land situated at Namao, most of CFB Namao, Alberta.
2000 - Transfer to the Canada Lands Company of 618 acres of land in Edmonton, Griesbach Barracks.


Just a few of the Ottawa DND properties in 1992. (From: The 1992 Federal Directory of Real Property, which is stored at Library and Archives Canada.)



MP Bill Casey and MP Peter Stoffer helped to save the military base at Shearwater. The Canada Lands Company returned most of the land to DND in the year 2009.
Many air force brats who grew up at CFB Rockcliffe, find it very upsetting that the base will be turned over to real estate developers, see my July 19, 2012 blog "ROCKCLIFFE WAS A HEAVEN ON EARTH". The Canada Lands Company estimates that 10,000 people will live at the former base; 10,000 people is the entire population of an Ontario town called Smiths Falls, where I was born.
Musician Bryan Adams and actor Michael J. Fox were military brats---Byran Adams at Rockcliffe, and Michael J. Fox at CFB North Bay in Ontario and CFB Chilliwack in B.C.
The following words and phrases apply to Canada Lands Company real estate transactions:
undersold -"Feds undersold women's prison in Kingston" - CANOE-CNEWS.
Once the Canada Lands Company buys a heritage building, the building loses all heritage protection.
The developer plans to demolish the heritage building.
fire sale

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Most of the CBC's real estate holdings are gone.

A website called the "Directory of Federal Real Property" provides a complete list of the Government of Canada's real estate holdings.
Yesterday, I discovered that the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has been "delisted" from the FDRP. Now I know why---the real estate portfolio has been liquidated:

1140 Yonge Street is now a Staples Business Depot Ltd. and Best Buy Business Depot; 230 Front Street West is a hotel and condo; 354 Jarvis is the Canadian National Ballet School and condos, and condos were constructed on the huge parking lot behind 354 Jarvis Street. Rosedale is one of the wealthiest communities in Canada. (This document is part of the "1992 Federal Directory of Real Property"-stored at Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa.)

In 1985, the CBC owned 485 buildings and 1,870 hectares of land. (From: The Nielsen Report-1985-Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa.)
According to a Globe and Mail article, the Crown corporation is selling the Montreal headquarters and 27 other properties, worth a billion dollars.
     "We've been hacking away at our vast portfolio of real estate" said Maryse Bertrand, CBC vice-president of real estate. (From: "CBC moves to find tenants for extra space at its Toronto headquarters" by Steve Ladurantaye, Globe and Mail June 15, 2012.)
Ms. Bertrand, Canadians own the buildings and land you are "hacking away at"; not you, Carole Taylor, Robert Rabinovitch or any other executive at Canada's national broadcaster. In 1992, the Crown corporation owned a few properties in Ottawa:



FOR SALE The Montreal headquarters of the CBC at 1400 Rene Levesque Boulevard East in Montreal.
Former Premier of Quebec Rene Levesque was a war correspondent for the CBC in 1952, during the Korean War. From 1956 until 1959, Rene Levesque hosted a weekly news program on the CBC.



In the year 2000, the CBC was seeking a buyer for a billion dollars worth of communications infrastructure. Not one dime from the sale was deposited into the Consolidated Revenue Fund, Canada's treasury, because of "The Broadcasting Act" (1991):
FOR SALE
-608 transmission towers
-750 transmission sites
-2,500 transmitters. (From: CBC/Radio Canada - CBC Seeks Buyer for its Transmission Assets-July 18, 2000.)
 Less than a year later, a Shawinigan, Quebec CBC Tower was demolished.YouTube has a video of the  demolition, google "Tower falling after plane crashes into it Mont Carmel". The transmission tower was almost as tall as the Empire State Building in New York City.
The Crown corporation recently decommissioned 620 analogue transmitters, which will negatively impact Canadians who live in the Far North and Atlantic Canada, rural parts of the country and low-income earners. During the 1980's, 99% of Canadians had access to CBC television and radio.(From: The Canadian Broadcasting Company -The Canadian Encyclopedia - Hurtig Publishing Limited, 1985.)
Since the Mulroney era, the Mother Corp has had a cozy relationship with cable companies.
In 1990, supposedly because of "budget cuts" the CBC discontinued its role as a parliamentary broadcaster. Now, a coalition of cable companies, called CPAC, is Canada's parliamentary and public affairs broadcaster.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation may sell Hockey Night in Canada to Rogers Communications.
Instead of laying off employees, cancelling television programs, shutting down television and radio stations and selling Crown property, the CBC should adhere to its Official Mandate:
MANDATE:
The programming provided by the Corporation should:
contribute to shared consciousness and identity---Do not sell Hockey Night in Canada, or cancel any more public affairs programs. Create a special, free channel to broadcast all the classic television programs that I loved watching:
The King of Kensington
The Juliette Show
The Forest Rangers
Quentin Durgens, M.P.
Anne Murray specials
Ian and Sylvia specials
Front Page Challenge
This Hour Has Seven Days
Billy Bishop Goes To War

My father George Shaw, and Gordon Pinsent, the star of "Quentin Durgens, M.P. and "The Forest Rangers."
Be predominantly and distinctively Canadian, to reflect Canada and its regions to national and regional audiences, while serving the special needs of those regions.---I never want to see "Roseanne", "Friends", "Married with Children", "Frasier" or any other American sitcom on a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation channel. And I will never understand why the CRTC and CBC cut funding for local programming in smaller communities.
Be made available throughout Canada by the most appropriate and efficient means...The broadcaster should never have discontinued analogue transmission service.
Many Canadians who cannot afford it will now have to pay for cable or satellite television service, thanks to unaccountable, highly-paid appointees.
CBC radio and television provided a vital service, particularly in Northern and Atlantic Canada, when they warned the population about impending weather disasters, such as hurricanes and massive snowfalls.

Sunday, October 21, 2012

My cat Tigger just had a stroke.

I find it difficult to concentrate on my blog, or anything else, because my beloved cat just had a stroke. The veterinarian calls the condition vestibular disease, and Tigger seems to be unbalanced, both physically and mentally.
My beautiful daughter, a former Little Miss Bayshore, found Tigger at a Bayshore, Ottawa park in the year 2000, when he was only a few weeks old:


My daughter after winning the "Little Miss Bayshore" beauty pageant.
Tigger the Cat is an orange tabby, and he was named after a Winnie the Pooh character. I couldn't imagine naming him Pooh or Eeyore, which are dreadful names . Tigger always has a deadpan expression on his face, but don't let that fool you---he is the most spoiled, happy cat in the universe.
 Tiggy follows me everywhere---when I watch t.v., he sits beside me on the sofa, and when I wash the dishes, he sits on the counter. Tigger alleviated some of the loneliness I felt, as a result of a condition called Empty Nest Syndrome..So he occupies a special place in my heart, in my soul, and losing him would be a terrible loss.
I'm afraid I panicked, when Tigger suffered a stroke...he was drooling and his eyes were quickly darting back and forth, and I thought he had rabies, even though he has been inoculated against the disease. After screaming, I put on my Kevlar Reinforced Oven Mitts, gently placed him in his powder blue carrying case and raced to the veterinary clinic. 
The vet knew right away what was wrong with Tigger - vestibular disease - and he was prescribed cat sedatives and from now on he has to eat geriatric cat food. My family jokingly said "The tranquilizers are for the cat, not for you"; and I had to find a baby gate to keep him from falling down the stairs. And I surrounded my bed with pillows, so he wouldn't get hurt when he flopped off the bed.
I have always admired celebrities who love animals. An actress named Sandy Dennis lived in Connecticut with her mother, three dogs and 37 cats. Sandy Dennis acted in several movies, including "The Fox" and "Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff" and died of cancer at a relatively young age.
Elizabeth Taylor rented a 120-foot yacht for her four dogs, and moored it on the Thames River because the United Kingdom had strict quarantine laws.
Mickey Rourke buries his beloved dogs at pet cemeteries. He is currently filming "Dead in Tombstone" in Romania, and has already adopted one dog, and plans to build a pet shelter in Romania.
 Tigger is recovering slowly, although one of his eyelids is droopy, and he is still uncoordinated when he walks.The oldest living cat in the world is Pinky, who was born in 1989 and lives with her caretakers in Hoyt, Kansas. (From:The Guinness World Records 2013).
I hope Tigger lives even longer than Pinky; Pinky had cancer and conquered the disease, so Tigger may have a chance at longevity.

Five nations participated in a NATO exercise called "Peacekeeper" in the North Atlantic in 1969.


Rotterdam: Canadian Ambassador to the Hague, Netherlands, Mr. A.J. Pick is welcomed aboard aircraft carrier HMCS Bonaventure by Commodore Noel Cogdon, Senior Canadian Officer Afloat. Bonaventure and three destroyers started a four-day courtesy visit to Rotterdam after participating in NATO exercise Peace Keeper in North Atlantic, September 1969.



The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation---and their never-ending sale of public property.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is quietly selling millions of dollars worth of land, transmission towers, analogue television equipment and buildings. What next, Hubert Lacroix? Apparently nothing is sacred at the CBC---100,000 record albums and CD's are gone, and they lost the Hockey Night in Canada theme song, which was referred to as "Canada's second national anthem". At least people can hear the "Hockey Night In Canada" song on hundreds of YouTube videos.


The Glenn Gould statue in front of CBC Headquarters in Toronto; at least for now, until it is sold at a "Crown Assets Distribution Centre", or auctioned off in New York City, Toronto or London, England.
According to the August 30, 2012 article "CBC/Radio-Canada puts surplus transmission assets up for sale":      "The assets for sale consist of land, transmission towers, analogue transmission equipment, and related buildings, located at 100 different locations across the country." 
Last summer, the CRTC (Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission) received many complaints from ordinary Canadians, for shutting down analogue television service; low-income and rural Canadians were particularly affected by the decision. Now we know---the CBC doesn't care about its mandate--- to serve the people of Canada; to preserve our heritage and to provide broadcasting services from coast to coast to coast.
They are primarily interested in amassing a fortune from the sale of Crown assets; ill-gotten money that they can KEEP:
   "All proceeds from the sale...will be used to support the creation of Canadian programming."
I've heard that line before.
In a 2002 speech to the Canadian Club in Regina, Saskatchewan, CBC executive Carole Taylor said:
     "In Vancouver, we own a parking lot right in the middle of downtown...crazy! What a waste, tying up capital dollars in a parking lot...dollars that could be used for programming."
Carole Taylor sold the parking lot to Concord Pacific, a company that built high-rise condos on Robson Street. Robson Street is part of the most exclusive neighbourhood in Vancouver, comparable to Yorkville and Rosedale in Toronto.
CBC employees in Vancouver are now forced to park in an underground parking lot two floors beneath the  building. And CBC parking lots in Toronto and Montreal were sold to builders of high-rise apartments.

Yet the Crown corporation receives a billion tax dollars a year "for programming".
  On July 1, 1994, Canada's National Broadcaster owned properties in British Columbia worth $50,830,700 million dollars:

From: "Introduction When a Country".
A huge CBC warehouse at 2555 Douglas Road in Burnaby, British Columbia, pictured below, was sold to Lordco Auto Parts for $6 million dollars.  




A 1997 document called "Let the Future Begin", which advises the CBC to sell all of its substantial production facilities.
 Liberal Senator Eugene Forsey said that privatization was "A slick way to skin the public"..."Privatization" and the "neoconservatism" from which it springs should be consigned to the rubbish heap where they belong, before they rob and enslave us." (From: A February 11, 1980 Maclean's Magazine article by Senator Eugene Forsey.)